ebook Edition Digital Download text. Might have no or limited illustrations. Download choice in a Microsoft Office Compatible Format, ePub Format, Kindle format, PDF format, or PDF Large Print Format. 1904 work on History and Travel Copyright expired An Ohio Woman in the Philippines Giving personal experiences and descriptions including incidents of Honolulu, ports in Japan and China INDEX PAGES Out of the Golden Gate 7-14 First Glimpses of Japan 15-20 From Yokohama to Tokio 21-25 Tokio 26-33 Japan in General 34-41 In Shanghai 42-49 Hong Kong to Manila 50-55 Iloilo and Jaro 56-66 The Natives 67-77 Wooings and Weddings 78-82 My First Fourth in the Philippines 83-88 Flowers, Fruits and Berries 89-92 The Markets 93-95 Philippine Agriculture 96-100 Minerals 101-103 Animals 104-106 Amusements and Street Parades 107-110 Festivals of the Church 111-114 Osteopathy 115-122 The McKinley Campaign 123-125 Governor Taft at Jaro 126-132 Shipwreck 133-138 Filipino Domestic Life 139-151 Islands Cebu and Romblom 152-154 Literature 155-159 The Gordon Scouts 160-162 Trials of Getting Home 163-166 written by Emily Bronson Conger 1843-1917 Emily Bronson Conger, a revolutionary 19th century woman, was a role model for women who wished to pursue nontraditional paths. The granddaughter of Herman Bronson, founder of Peninsula, Ohio, Conger came from strong patriotic stock. Little is known about her early years and education. She married Union Civil War Col. Arthur Latham Conger around 1865, and they had three sons-Kenyon B., Arthur W, and Latham H. Conger. Conger's husband was a successful farmer and Akron industrialist. When he was elected treasurer of Summit County, she joined his administration as deputy county treasurer. This was unusual, because women had not been granted the right to vote at that time. In addition to her official role in county government, Conger was talented in music and volunteered at St. Paul's Episcopal Church. She was a natural hostess and was often giving grand social parties. Being the patriot that she was, it was natural for Conger to take interest in organizations like the Dames of the Loyal Legion, the Order of the Eastern Star and the Women's Relief Corps. She started the Cuyahoga Portage Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Shortly before her husband's death in 1899, Conger embarked on a new journey. The study of osteopathy fascinated her because she had seen the miraculous recovery by her husband after a serious stroke. She studied at a school in Missouri and was one of the first women in the United States to be given a degree in the field. She firmly believed in the practice and resisted efforts to prohibit it and became vice president of the American Association of Osteopathy. After her husband's death, Conger traveled with one of her sons to the Philippines to work with American soldiers. She also helped care for mothers and their babies. Known as Senora Blanca by the natives, she wrote a book called An Ohio Woman in the Philippines, based on her experiences. Photo courtesy of the Women's History Project of the Akron Area. --Penny Fox Excerpt: With the words ringing out over the clear waters of San Francisco Bay as the Steamer Morgan City pulled from the dock, "Now, mother, do be sure and take the very next boat and come to me," I waved a yes as best I could, and, turning to my friends, said: "I am going to the Philippines; but do not, I beg of you, come to the dock to see me off." I did not then realize what it meant to start alone. I vowed to stay in my cabin during the entire trip, but, as we steamed out of the Golden Gate, there was an invitation to come forth, a prophesy of good, a promise to return, in the glory of the last rays of the setting sun as they traced upon the portals, "We shall be back in the morning." And so I set out with something of cheer and hope, in spite of all the remonstrances, all the woeful prognostications of friends. Book on CD Edition produced by The Again Shop 2013 Digital Download text. Might have no or limited illustrations. Download choice in a Microsoft Office Compatible Format, ePub Format, Kindle format, PDF format, or PDF Large Print Format.
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Digital Download ebook "An Ohio Woman in the Philippines" by Emily Bronson Conger

Digital Download ebook "An Ohio Woman in the Philippines" by Emily Bronson Conger

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ebook Edition Digital Download text. Might have no or limited illustrations. Download choice in a Microsoft Office Compatible Format, ePub Format, Kindle format, PDF format, or PDF Large Print Format.

1904 work on History and Travel
Copyright expired
An Ohio Woman in the Philippines

Giving personal experiences and descriptions including incidents of Honolulu, ports in Japan and China


INDEX

PAGES

Out of the Golden Gate 7-14 First Glimpses of Japan 15-20 From Yokohama to Tokio 21-25 Tokio 26-33 Japan in General 34-41 In Shanghai 42-49 Hong Kong to Manila 50-55 Iloilo and Jaro 56-66 The Natives 67-77 Wooings and Weddings 78-82 My First Fourth in the Philippines 83-88 Flowers, Fruits and Berries 89-92 The Markets 93-95 Philippine Agriculture 96-100 Minerals 101-103 Animals 104-106 Amusements and Street Parades 107-110 Festivals of the Church 111-114 Osteopathy 115-122 The McKinley Campaign 123-125 Governor Taft at Jaro 126-132 Shipwreck 133-138 Filipino Domestic Life 139-151 Islands Cebu and Romblom 152-154 Literature 155-159 The Gordon Scouts 160-162 Trials of Getting Home 163-166

written by

Emily Bronson Conger

1843-1917

Emily Bronson Conger, a revolutionary 19th century woman, was a role model for women who wished to pursue nontraditional paths.

The granddaughter of Herman Bronson, founder of Peninsula, Ohio, Conger came from strong patriotic stock. Little is known about her early years and education. She married Union Civil War Col. Arthur Latham Conger around 1865, and they had three sons-Kenyon B., Arthur W, and Latham H. Conger.

Conger's husband was a successful farmer and Akron industrialist. When he was elected treasurer of Summit County, she joined his administration as deputy county treasurer. This was unusual, because women had not been granted the right to vote at that time.

In addition to her official role in county government, Conger was talented in music and volunteered at St. Paul's Episcopal Church. She was a natural hostess and was often giving grand social parties.

Being the patriot that she was, it was natural for Conger to take interest in organizations like the Dames of the Loyal Legion, the Order of the Eastern Star and the Women's Relief Corps. She started the Cuyahoga Portage Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Shortly before her husband's death in 1899, Conger embarked on a new journey. The study of osteopathy fascinated her because she had seen the miraculous recovery by her husband after a serious stroke. She studied at a school in Missouri and was one of the first women in the United States to be given a degree in the field. She firmly believed in the practice and resisted efforts to prohibit it and became vice president of the American Association of Osteopathy.

After her husband's death, Conger traveled with one of her sons to the Philippines to work with American soldiers. She also helped care for mothers and their babies. Known as Senora Blanca by the natives, she wrote a book called An Ohio Woman in the Philippines, based on her experiences.

Photo courtesy of the Women's History Project of the Akron Area.

--Penny Fox
Excerpt:

With the words ringing out over the clear waters of San Francisco Bay as the Steamer Morgan City pulled from the dock, "Now, mother, do be sure and take the very next boat and come to me," I waved a yes as best I could, and, turning to my friends, said: "I am going to the Philippines; but do not, I beg of you, come to the dock to see me off."

I did not then realize what it meant to start alone. I vowed to stay in my cabin during the entire trip, but, as we steamed out of the Golden Gate, there was an invitation to come forth, a prophesy of good, a promise to return, in the glory of the last rays of the setting sun as they traced upon the portals, "We shall be back in the morning." And so I set out with something of cheer and hope, in spite of all the remonstrances, all the woeful prognostications of friends.

Book on CD Edition produced by

The Again Shop

2013

Digital Download text. Might have no or limited illustrations. Download choice in a Microsoft Office Compatible Format, ePub Format, Kindle format, PDF format, or PDF Large Print Format.

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