Digital Download text. Might have no or limited illustrations. Download choice in a Microsoft Office Compatible Format, ePub Format, Kindle format, PDF format, or PDF Large Print Format. Originally Published: 1858 Copyright expired Language: English Wordcount: 126,631 / 467 pgs Anecdotes of Dogs A French writer has boldly affirmed, that with the exception of women there is nothing on earth so agreeable, or so necessary to the comfort of man, as the dog. This assertion may readily be disputed, but still it will be allowed that man, deprived of the companionship and services of the dog, would be a solitary and, in many respects, a helpless being. Let us look at the shepherd, as the evening closes in and his flock is dispersed over the almost inaccessible heights of mountains; they are speedily collected by his indefatigable dog--nor do his services end here: he guards either the flock or his master's cottage by night, and a slight caress, and the coarsest food, satisfy him for all his trouble. The dog performs the services of a horse in the more northern regions; while in Cuba and some other hot countries, he has been the scourge and terror of the runaway negroes. In the destruction of wild beasts, or the less dangerous stag, or in attacking the bull, the dog has proved himself to possess pre-eminent courage. In many instances he has died in the defence of his master. He has saved him from drowning, warned him of approaching danger, served him faithfully in poverty and distress, and if deprived of sight has gently led him about. When spoken to, he tries to hold conversation with him by the movement of his tail or the expression of his eyes. If his master wants amusement in the field or wood, he is delighted to have an opportunity of procuring it for him; if he finds himself in solitude, his dog will be a cheerful and agreeable companion, and maybe, when death comes, the last to forsake the grave of his beloved master. CONTENTS. INTRODUCTION--Value, propensities, and origin of the dog, 1 et passim--the wolf partially domesticated, 6--wild dogs of Ceylon, 15--Sir Walter Scott's bull-dog terrier Camp, 16--the dog and the pieman, 17--death of a dog from affection for its deceased mistress, 18--frozen fowls rescued by a house-dog, 19--Sir R. Brownrigg's dog, 19--the author's terrier Phiz, 20--a dog fond of travelling by himself, 20--runaway horse caught by a dog, 21--lost money guarded by, 21--dogs can reckon time, 22--death of a dog from joy at the return of his master, 22--faithfulness of a dog to its charge, 24--the dog's character influenced by that of its master, 25--sense of smelling, 26--duel about a dog, 28--murder prevented by, 29--a faithful dog killed by mistake, 30--sporting anecdotes of Smoaker, Bachelor, Blunder, &c., 31--intelligence of the dog, 42--tact in cat-hunting, 44--find their way home from long distances, 46--bantam rescued from a game cock, 46--perception of right and wrong, 47--turkey punished for gluttony, 48--speaking dogs, 48-9--a singing dog, 50--creatures of habit, 50--Caniche and the breeches, 51--distinguishes his master's customers, 54--a robber killed by a dog, 55--Dr. Hooper's dog, 55--the fireman's dog, Tyke, 56--the fireman's dog, Bill, 60--dog used as a servant, 61--Mr. Backhouse's dog, 62--the post-dog's revenge, 62--dog returns from Bangalore to Pondicherry, 63--Mr. Decouick's dog, 63--a dog saves human life, 64--guards a chair dropped from a waggon, 64--rescues his master from an avalanche, 64--spaniel tracks his master to Drury Lane, and discovers him in the pit, 65--large dog rescues a small one from drowning, 65--a canine messenger, 66--contrivance of a Newfoundland to get a bun, 67--dog lost for nine weeks in the dome of St. Paul's, 67--support themselves in a wild state, 69--laughable account of the transmigration of souls in connexion with dogs, 71--sheep-dogs in the Pyrenees, 76--Mrs. S. C. Hall's dog, 77--musical spaniel of Darmstadt, 77--Lord Grenville's lines on the dog, 82. THE IRISH AND HIGHLAND WOLF-DOG. History of the Irish wolf-dog, 86 et seq. passim--supposed recognition of a wolf-dog of the Irish blood royal, 86--lines on the Irish wolf-dog, 88--anecdotes from Plutarch, 89--the dog of Montargis, 90--the dog of Aughrim, 93--wolf-hunting in Tyrone, 94--sheep-killing wolf-dog, 107--Buskar and Bran, 112--incident with Lord Ossulton's hounds, 116--Bruno and O'Toole, 117--a deer-hound recovers a glove from a boy, 119--Sir W. Scott's dog Maida, 120--a deer-hound detains a suspicious person, 120--follows a wounded deer for three days, 121--Comhstri drowns a stag, 122--Scotch dogs much prized in England, 123--Llewellyn and Beth Gelert, 124--Lady Morgan on the Irish wolf-dog, 127. THE NEWFOUNDLAND DOG. Character, &c., 133--saves people from drowning, 135--Baby, 136--saves a child from being run over, 136--saves a spaniel from being drowned, 137--saves a gentleman from drowning at Portsmouth, 138--saves a man in a mill-stream, 138--calculating dogs, 138--Sabbath party disturbed by a dog, 139--Archdeacon Wix's dog, 140--a Newfoundland brings away breeches containing money belonging to his master, 143--commits suicide, 145--saves a coachman in the Thames, 146--tries to drown a spaniel, 147--uses his paw as a fishing-bait, 148--in carrying two hats puts one inside other, 148--three dogs previously enemies unite against a common foe, 149--a dog saves his drowning enemy, 151--releases himself and companions from captivity, 152--a swimming-wager amusingly lost by a dog's care, 153--the dog as postman, 153--swims for ten hours in a tempestuous sea, 153--saves his dead master's pocket-book, 154--Lord Grenville's lines on the, 155--Newfoundland dog ducks his aggressor, 157--carries a rope to the shore, 158--saves an ungrateful master, 158--guardian of a lady's honour, 160--anecdotes of Mr. M'Intyre's dog Dandie, 160-5--a Newfoundland causes the detection of a dishonest porter, 165--saves twelve persons from drowning, 166--watches over his drunken master, 167--his humanity occasions a disturbance at Woolwich Theatre, 167--carries a lanthorn before his master, 168--saves the lives of all on board the Durham Packet, 170--drowns a pet lamb out of jealousy, 171--rescues a canary which had flown into the sea, 171--saves his old master from robbers, 173--St. John's and Labrador dogs, 176--long remembrance of injuries, 177--discovers a poacher, 178--discretion and revenge, 178--returns from Berwick to London, 179--the Romans had some dog of the same kind, 179--liberates a man who had fallen into a gravel-pit, 180--Boatswain provides his mistress a dinner, 181--a trespasser detained, 181--Victor at the Battle of Copenhagen, 182--a Newfoundland dog retrieves on the ice, 182--fetches a coat from the tailor's, 183--lines by Lord Eldon, 184. THE COLLEY OR SHEPHERD'S DOG. Saves the life of Mr. Satterthwaite, 186--the Ettrick Shepherd's dog, Sirrah, collects a scattered flock at midnight, 188--Hector, 189--points the cat, 191--has an ear for music, 194--hears where his master is going, and precedes him, 196--a wonderful sheep-dog, 199--a bitch having pupped deposits her young in the hills, and afterwards fetches them home, 201--cunning of sheep-stealing dogs, 202-5--a sheep-dog dies of starvation whilst tending his charge, 206--discrimination of a sheep-dog, 207--a sheep-dog remembers all the turnings of a road, 208--follows a young woman who had borrowed his mistress's cloak, 211--Drummer saves a cow, 212--C THE ST. BERNARD DOG. Mrs. Houston's lines on the, 240--peculiar intelligence of, 241--the monks and their dogs, 242--a dog saves a woman's life, 243--intuitive foreboding of danger, 244--a dog saves a child, 245--revenges his ill-treated master, 247--a St. Bernard dog named Barry saves forty lives, 248--destruction of a whole party by an avalanche, 249. THE BLOODHOUND. Habits of the bloodhound, 251--its remarkable scent, 252--pursuit of Wallace with a bloodhound, 253--bloodhounds employed for hunting negroes in Cuba, 253--a bloodhound traces a miscreant twenty miles, 255--Sir W. Scott's description of a bloodhound, 255--extract from Wanley's "Wonders," 256--a bloodhound discovers a lost child, 257--the Spanish chasseurs and their dogs, 258--a sheepstealer discovered by a bloodhound, 260--atrocities of the Spaniards, 261. Plus many more
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ebook "ANECDOTES OF DOGS" by Edward Jesse - (Choose from 5 Text Formats)

ebook "ANECDOTES OF DOGS" by Edward Jesse - (Choose from 5 Text Formats)

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Description

Digital Download text. Might have no or limited illustrations. Download choice in a Microsoft Office Compatible Format, ePub Format, Kindle format, PDF format, or PDF Large Print Format.

Originally Published: 1858
Copyright expired
Language: English
Wordcount: 126,631 / 467 pgs

Anecdotes of Dogs

A French writer has boldly affirmed, that with the exception of women there is nothing on earth so agreeable, or so necessary to the comfort of man, as the dog. This assertion may readily be disputed, but still it will be allowed that man, deprived of the companionship and services of the dog, would be a solitary and, in many respects, a helpless being. Let us look at the shepherd, as the evening closes in and his flock is dispersed over the almost inaccessible heights of mountains; they are speedily collected by his indefatigable dog--nor do his services end here: he guards either the flock or his master's cottage by night, and a slight caress, and the coarsest food, satisfy him for all his trouble. The dog performs the services of a horse in the more northern regions; while in Cuba and some other hot countries, he has been the scourge and terror of the runaway negroes. In the destruction of wild beasts, or the less dangerous stag, or in attacking the bull, the dog has proved himself to possess pre-eminent courage. In many instances he has died in the defence of his master. He has saved him from drowning, warned him of approaching danger, served him faithfully in poverty and distress, and if deprived of sight has gently led him about. When spoken to, he tries to hold conversation with him by the movement of his tail or the expression of his eyes. If his master wants amusement in the field or wood, he is delighted to have an opportunity of procuring it for him; if he finds himself in solitude, his dog will be a cheerful and agreeable companion, and maybe, when death comes, the last to forsake the grave of his beloved master.


CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION--Value, propensities, and origin of the dog, 1 et passim--the wolf partially domesticated, 6--wild dogs of Ceylon, 15--Sir Walter Scott's bull-dog terrier Camp, 16--the dog and the pieman, 17--death of a dog from affection for its deceased mistress, 18--frozen fowls rescued by a house-dog, 19--Sir R. Brownrigg's dog, 19--the author's terrier Phiz, 20--a dog fond of travelling by himself, 20--runaway horse caught by a dog, 21--lost money guarded by, 21--dogs can reckon time, 22--death of a dog from joy at the return of his master, 22--faithfulness of a dog to its charge, 24--the dog's character influenced by that of its master, 25--sense of smelling, 26--duel about a dog, 28--murder prevented by, 29--a faithful dog killed by mistake, 30--sporting anecdotes of Smoaker, Bachelor, Blunder, &c., 31--intelligence of the dog, 42--tact in cat-hunting, 44--find their way home from long distances, 46--bantam rescued from a game cock, 46--perception of right and wrong, 47--turkey punished for gluttony, 48--speaking dogs, 48-9--a singing dog, 50--creatures of habit, 50--Caniche and the breeches, 51--distinguishes his master's customers, 54--a robber killed by a dog, 55--Dr. Hooper's dog, 55--the fireman's dog, Tyke, 56--the fireman's dog, Bill, 60--dog used as a servant, 61--Mr. Backhouse's dog, 62--the post-dog's revenge, 62--dog returns from Bangalore to Pondicherry, 63--Mr. Decouick's dog, 63--a dog saves human life, 64--guards a chair dropped from a waggon, 64--rescues his master from an avalanche, 64--spaniel tracks his master to Drury Lane, and discovers him in the pit, 65--large dog rescues a small one from drowning, 65--a canine messenger, 66--contrivance of a Newfoundland to get a bun, 67--dog lost for nine weeks in the dome of St. Paul's, 67--support themselves in a wild state, 69--laughable account of the transmigration of souls in connexion with dogs, 71--sheep-dogs in the Pyrenees, 76--Mrs. S. C. Hall's dog, 77--musical spaniel of Darmstadt, 77--Lord Grenville's lines on the dog, 82.

THE IRISH AND HIGHLAND WOLF-DOG.

History of the Irish wolf-dog, 86 et seq. passim--supposed recognition of a wolf-dog of the Irish blood royal, 86--lines on the Irish wolf-dog, 88--anecdotes from Plutarch, 89--the dog of Montargis, 90--the dog of Aughrim, 93--wolf-hunting in Tyrone, 94--sheep-killing wolf-dog, 107--Buskar and Bran, 112--incident with Lord Ossulton's hounds, 116--Bruno and O'Toole, 117--a deer-hound recovers a glove from a boy, 119--Sir W. Scott's dog Maida, 120--a deer-hound detains a suspicious person, 120--follows a wounded deer for three days, 121--Comhstri drowns a stag, 122--Scotch dogs much prized in England, 123--Llewellyn and Beth Gelert, 124--Lady Morgan on the Irish wolf-dog, 127.

THE NEWFOUNDLAND DOG.

Character, &c., 133--saves people from drowning, 135--Baby, 136--saves a child from being run over, 136--saves a spaniel from being drowned, 137--saves a gentleman from drowning at Portsmouth, 138--saves a man in a mill-stream, 138--calculating dogs, 138--Sabbath party disturbed by a dog, 139--Archdeacon Wix's dog, 140--a Newfoundland brings away breeches containing money belonging to his master, 143--commits suicide, 145--saves a coachman in the Thames, 146--tries to drown a spaniel, 147--uses his paw as a fishing-bait, 148--in carrying two hats puts one inside other, 148--three dogs previously enemies unite against a common foe, 149--a dog saves his drowning enemy, 151--releases himself and companions from captivity, 152--a swimming-wager amusingly lost by a dog's care, 153--the dog as postman, 153--swims for ten hours in a tempestuous sea, 153--saves his dead master's pocket-book, 154--Lord Grenville's lines on the, 155--Newfoundland dog ducks his aggressor, 157--carries a rope to the shore, 158--saves an ungrateful master, 158--guardian of a lady's honour, 160--anecdotes of Mr. M'Intyre's dog Dandie, 160-5--a Newfoundland causes the detection of a dishonest porter, 165--saves twelve persons from drowning, 166--watches over his drunken master, 167--his humanity occasions a disturbance at Woolwich Theatre, 167--carries a lanthorn before his master, 168--saves the lives of all on board the Durham Packet, 170--drowns a pet lamb out of jealousy, 171--rescues a canary which had flown into the sea, 171--saves his old master from robbers, 173--St. John's and Labrador dogs, 176--long remembrance of injuries, 177--discovers a poacher, 178--discretion and revenge, 178--returns from Berwick to London, 179--the Romans had some dog of the same kind, 179--liberates a man who had fallen into a gravel-pit, 180--Boatswain provides his mistress a dinner, 181--a trespasser detained, 181--Victor at the Battle of Copenhagen, 182--a Newfoundland dog retrieves on the ice, 182--fetches a coat from the tailor's, 183--lines by Lord Eldon, 184.

THE COLLEY OR SHEPHERD'S DOG.

Saves the life of Mr. Satterthwaite, 186--the Ettrick Shepherd's dog, Sirrah, collects a scattered flock at midnight, 188--Hector, 189--points the cat, 191--has an ear for music, 194--hears where his master is going, and precedes him, 196--a wonderful sheep-dog, 199--a bitch having pupped deposits her young in the hills, and afterwards fetches them home, 201--cunning of sheep-stealing dogs, 202-5--a sheep-dog dies of starvation whilst tending his charge, 206--discrimination of a sheep-dog, 207--a sheep-dog remembers all the turnings of a road, 208--follows a young woman who had borrowed his mistress's cloak, 211--Drummer saves a cow, 212--C

THE ST. BERNARD DOG.

Mrs. Houston's lines on the, 240--peculiar intelligence of, 241--the monks and their dogs, 242--a dog saves a woman's life, 243--intuitive foreboding of danger, 244--a dog saves a child, 245--revenges his ill-treated master, 247--a St. Bernard dog named Barry saves forty lives, 248--destruction of a whole party by an avalanche, 249.

THE BLOODHOUND.

Habits of the bloodhound, 251--its remarkable scent, 252--pursuit of Wallace with a bloodhound, 253--bloodhounds employed for hunting negroes in Cuba, 253--a bloodhound traces a miscreant twenty miles, 255--Sir W. Scott's description of a bloodhound, 255--extract from Wanley's "Wonders," 256--a bloodhound discovers a lost child, 257--the Spanish chasseurs and their dogs, 258--a sheepstealer discovered by a bloodhound, 260--atrocities of the Spaniards, 261.

Plus many more

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